Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Medications should be taken on an EMPTY or Full stomach


Drug food Interactions 

 
Medications which should be taken on an
EMPTY stomach
Alendronate
(Fosamax)
AmpicillinAstemizoleBethanechol
BisacodylCaptopril
(Take 1 hour before meals)
Cefibuten
(Cedax)
Cilostazol
(Pletal)
DemeclocyclineDicloxacillinDidanosine
(Videx)
Etidronate
(Didronel)
Felodipine
(Plendil)
Indinavir
(Crixivan)
Lansoprazole
(take before eating)
Levothyroxine
loratadine
(Claritin)
loracarbef
(Lorabid)
MethotrexateMoexipril
(Univasc)
Mycophenolate
(Cellcept)
Omeprazole
Take before eating
OxacillinPenicillamine
Perindopril
(Aceon)
Repaglinide
(Prandin)
RifampinRifabutin
(Mycobutin)
Riluzole
(Rilutek)
Roxithromycin (take at least 15 minutes before or after a meal)Sucralfate
(Carafate)
Sulfamethoxazole - trimethoprim (Bactrim)
SulfadiazineTetracycline
(Do not take with milk or other dairy products)
Tolcapone
(Tasmar)
Zafirlukast (Accolate)
Zalcitabine
(Hivid)
   
 
Medications which should be
Taken with FOOD
Allopurinol
(take after meal)
Atovaquone
(Mepron)
AugmentinAspirin
Amiodarone
(Cordarone)
Baclofen
(Lioresal)
Bromocriptine
(Parlodel)
clofazimine
(Lamprene)
Carvedilol
(Coreg)
Carbamazepine
(Tegretol)
ChloroquineCimetidine
(Tagamet)
Cefpodoxime
(Vantin)
Diclofenac
(Voltaren_
Divalproex sodium
(Depakote)
Doxycycline
Felbamate
(Felbatol)
fenofibrate
(TriCor)
FiorinalFludrocortisone
fenoprofenGriseofulvinglyburide (take with breakfast)Hydrocortisone
Hydroxychloroquine
(Plaquenil)
IndomethacinIron preparations (Take between meals--if GI upset occurs take with food)Itraconazole capsules
KetorolacLithiumMetronidazoleMisoprostol
(Cytotec)
methanaminemebendazolemethylprednisolonenaltrexone
NaproxenNelfinavir
(Viracept)
NitrofurantoinNiacin
OlsalazinePerphenazinePentoxifyllinePergolide
PiroxicamPotassium saltsPrednisoneProcainamide
Ritonavir
(Norvir)
SalsalateSaquinavirSevelamer
(Renagel)
SpironolactoneSulfasalazineSulfinpyrazoneSulindac
TiclopidineTolmetinTrazodoneTroglitazone
Valproic acid   
 
Drug - grapefruit interactions:
Drugs which may exhibit increased serum concentrations based on this interaction
amiodaroneastemizolealprazolamatorvastatin
benzodiazepines buspironecarbamazepinecarvedilol
cerivastatincilostazol clarithromycinClomipramine 
codeinecyclosporine dapsonedextromethorphan
diazepamdiltiazemestrogenserythromycin
felodipinefentanylfinasteridehaloperidol
indinavirlercanidipinelidocainelovastatin
midazolammethadonenelfinavirnifedipine
nicardipinenimodipinenisoldipinenitrendipine
ondansetronpaclitaxelprogestinsprogesterone
quinidineritonavirsalmeterolsaquinavir
simvastatintacrolimustrazodonetriazolam
vincristinezaleplonzolpidem 
Note: there may be omissions on this list. Absence of a drug
does not necessarily indicate that the drug lacks this potential
interaction. 
 
Warfarin - food Interactions 

Management of Dietary Interactions and Vitamin K: dietary consistency is the key to maintaining a sustained, stable response during warfarin therapy. Patients should be aware of vitamin K content in common foods, particularly foods high in vitamin K (green leafy vegetables (broccoli, Brussel sprouts, turnip greens, kale, spinach, beet greens), Cauliflower , legumes, mayonnaise, canola and soybean oils), and should maintain a consistent amount of these foods in their diet.
The following foods should be avoided or limited, since they also can effect warfarin therapy:  caffeinated beverages (cola, coffee, tea, hot chocolate, chocolate milk).
Alcohol intake greater than 3 drinks daily can increase the effect of Coumadin. As long as alcohol intake does not exceed 3 drinks daily, clotting times should not be affected. This amount of alcohol is present in 12 ounces of table wine or three 12  ounce beers. (Acute binges can raise INR. Chronic alcohol ingestion may decrease INR. )
Herbal supplements can affect bleeding time.  Coenzyme Q10 is an herbal supplement whose chemical structure is similar to vitamin K, so it has the potential to affect bleeding time.  Herbal teas: green tea, buckeye, horsechestnut, tonka, bean, meliot, and woodruff.  Other examples include: feverfew, garlic, and ginseng.  Herbal medications should either be avoided or used consistently while on warfarin therapy.

Saturday, March 7, 2015

PHARMACY MANAGEMENT

PHARMACY MANAGEMENT PDF FREE DOWNLOAD